North Korea hackers steal South Korea war plans

"South Korean and USA air forces showed off the allies' resolve for strong retaliation against North Korea's nuclear and missile threats", the JCS said in a statement carried by local news agency Yonhap.

Reuters reported that the U.S. military said in a separate statement it conducted drills with Japanese fighters after the exercise with South Korea, making it the first time United States bombers have conducted training with fighters from both Japan and South Korea at night.

A spokesman from South Korea's Defense Ministry declined to comment, saying the information is classified.

Seoul and Washington have been on alert over a possible North Korean long-range missile test in line with this week's anniversary of the founding of the reclusive state's ruling party.

This positive process is worth a try", said an editorial in the state mouthpiece Global Times, following yesterday's military exercises."War would be a nightmare for the Korean Peninsula and surrounding regions.

US President Donald Trump tweeted last week that North Korea has been "making fools" of US negotiators for 25 years, adding that "only one thing will work" in dealing with the Kim Jong Un regime.


After entering South Korean airspace, the two bombers carried out air-to-ground missile drills in waters off the east coast of South Korea, then flew over the South to waters between it and China to repeat the drill, the release said.

"There is an urgent need for the military to change and update parts that were stolen by North Korea", Lee said.

Outside governments and global human rights organizations say Kim rules as a tyrant over a largely malnourished and abused population while enjoying a luxurious lifestyle backed up by a weapons program almost advanced enough to viably target the USA mainland with nuclear-tipped missiles. Kim is the third generation of his family to rule North Korea.

"They likely remain committed to pursuing targets in the energy sector, especially in South Korea and among the US and its allies, as a means of deterring potential war or sowing disorder during a time of armed conflict". He revealed that around 235 gigabytes of military documents had been stolen from the Defence Integrated Data Centre, and that 80% of them have yet to be identified.

Commenting on the news is Chris Doman, security researcher at AlienVault, who is investigating hacking groups in North Korea.

  • Sylvester Abbott