Chicago, Cook County sues Uber for concealing data breech

"This is an approximation rather than an accurate and definitive count because sometimes the information we get through the app or our website that we use to assign a country code is not the same as the country where a person actually lives". 10,888 Uber drivers in Washington have had their license numbers compromised by the data breach and according Ferguson's press release, Uber was required to notify the passengers and drivers of breach as well as the attorney general's office within 45 days of the attack.

Uber has revealed that 2.7m riders and drivers have been affected by the massive hack which hit 57m worldwide.

In a statement, deputy commisioner of the ICO, James Dipple-Johnstone, said: On its own [the stolen] information is unlikely to pose a direct threat to citizens. People should continue to be vigilant and follow the advice from the NCSC.

Several states, including Missouri, Massachusetts and NY, have opened investigations, and the city of Chicago sued Uber on Tuesday for failing to notify affected residents.

Last week, Uber acknowledged that more than a year ago, it paid hackers a US$100,000 (NZ$145,050) ransom to destroy personal data they stole concerning more than 57 million of its customers and drivers.

The data regulator, the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), has said it was yet to receive technical reports on the incident and called on the company to alert affected customers as soon as possible.


"When [the breach] happened, we took immediate steps to secure the data, shut down further unauthorised access, and strengthen our data security", the company added.

"Uber's conduct has been truly stunning".

The letter also notes that Uber entered into a consent order with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in August 2017 in response to the company's privacy and data security standards.

Similarly, the UK's Minister of State for Digital, Matt Hancock, said, "The Government expects Uber to respond fully to the incident with the urgency it demands and to provide the appropriate support to its customers and drivers in the United Kingdom".

That revelation prompted a delay in a high-profile trial over whether Uber stole self-driving auto technology from Waymo, a Google spinoff.

  • Tracy Klein