NASA Spooky Space 'Sounds' Serve Up Intergalactic Treat for Halloween

Just in time for Halloween, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration released a playlist of "spooky sounds" from outer space, recorded by its spacecraft across the solar system.

"Soaring to the depths of our universe, gallant spacecraft roam the cosmos, snapping images of celestial wonders". These radio emissions are then converted into sound waves, and the result is the spooky sounds NASA put together into a playlist.

NASA revealed that the odd space sounds were captured as radiowaves, which have now been converted into sound waves of "howling planets" and whispering noises from distant stars. Sounds from Juno are included in NASA's Halloween playlist.

The 22 short tracks available at the NASA website include samplings from Jupiter's magnetic field as detected by the spacecraft Juno, auroras near the poles of Saturn as picked up by Cassini, radar echoes from Saturn's moon Titan and dust from comet Tempel 1.


In classic NASA fashion, the playlist also includes an explanation of what listeners are actually hearing in the sound clips. Therefore, it released a series of recordings of the scariest sounds which could be heard in space.

When Juno entered Jupiter's orbit previous year, the planet's magnetic field collided with the solar wind (charged particles released by the sun). It captured radio signals from the moon's magnetosphere - not from a classic episode of "The Twilight Zone" - using a Plasma Wave Experiment device. "These plasma waves, like the roaring ocean surf, create a rhythmic cacophony that - with the right tools - we can hear across space", Nasa said earlier this year.

Sounds of a Comet Encounter: During its February 14, 2011, flyby of comet Tempel 1, an instrument on the protective shield on NASA's Stardust spacecraft was pelted by dust particles and small rocks, as can be heard in this audio track. Saturn's radio emissions have also been made part of the compilation. During its February 14, 2011, flyby of comet Tempel 1, an instrument on the protective shield on NASA's Stardust spacecraft was pelted by dust particles and small rocks, as can be heard in this audio track.

  • Valerie Cook