Mueller removed Federal Bureau of Investigation agent from Russian Federation probe for anti-Trump texts

Mueller, the special counsel examining alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, removed FBI agent Peter Strzok from the investigation over the summer, according to The New York Times.

Meanwhile, the inspector general's office at the Justice Department said the incident is part of a wider probe into how the FBI has handled investigations relating to the election.

Mr Trump wrote that after years under fired FBI director James Comey, "with the phony and dishonest Clinton investigation (and more)", the agency's reputation "is in Tatters - worst in History!"

Three sources told the Times that the catalyst was the discovery of text messages in which Strzok reacted to news events - including presidential debates - in ways that could be deemed critical of Donald Trump.

To his credit, Special Counsel Robert Mueller, whose investigation has already cost taxpayers over $5 million, shuffled Strzok off to the Siberian bowels of the FBI's human resources department.

The Post has repeatedly sought comment from Strzok and Page, but got no response.


The office of Special Counsel Robert Mueller, pictured here on June 21, removed investigator Peter Strzok over allegations about text messages he exchanged.

Justice Department spokeswoman Sara Isgur Flores said in an email that "we disagree with the chairman's characterization and will continue to work with congressional committees to provide the information they request consistent with our national security responsibilities".

Defenders of Strzok and Page inside the Federal Bureau of Investigation said that because there was no direct supervisory role between Page and Strzok in the workplace, there wasn't anything professionally wrong about having an affair, but added they understood why Mueller would not want anyone engaged in such conduct on his team.

Robert Mueller removed an FBI agent from his investigation into alleged Russian election meddling, people briefed on the matter told United States media.

Nunes said April 6 he was stepping back amid criticism of his handling of classified material, reportedly obtained from White House officials, that he said showed officials of former President Barack Obama's administration "unmasked" the identities of people close to Mr. Trump who were mentioned in legal surveillance of foreign individuals.

  • Tracy Klein