Trump says immigration deal 'probably dead'

"I want a merit based system of immigration and people who will help take our country to the next level".

Nielsen said that Trump is simply advocating a merit-based immigration system, similar to those in Canada and Australia. The deal had included a pathway to citizenship for the "Dreamers" that would take up to 12 years, as well as $1.6 billion for border security, including Trump's promised wall along the U.S. -Mexico border.

"I do not believe DACA is dead", Nielsen said on "Fox News Sunday".

David Perdue of Georgia, said in an interview Sunday on ABC's "This Week With George Stephanopoulos" that Trump did not use the word "shithole".

It favors African countries and was part of an immigration deal Trump was negotiating with the group of Democratic and Republican lawmakers Thursday when he made his explosive comments.

But that agreement was cast into doubt the same day when a firestorm erupted after reports surfaced that President Trump, during a meeting with lawmakers over an immigration bill, asked why the USA was accepting immigrants from "shithole countries" referring reportedly to immigrants from Haiti and Africa.

Lindsey Graham, who was also at the meeting, seemed to confirm that report in a statement in which he said "following comments by the president, I said my piece directly to him yesterday".


Trump's "shithole countries" remarks were confirmed by Senator Dick Durbin, a Democrat who attended the White House meeting, after it was reported by the Washington Post and other media.

Inside the White House, staffers were largely unfazed, even as the political and diplomatic fallout mounted.

The announcement comes days after a federal judge in California temporarily blocked the Trump administration's efforts to end DACA.

"We do not recall the president saying these comments specifically, but what he did call out was the imbalance in our current immigration system, which does not protect American workers and our national interest", the statement said.

In deciding to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the Trump administration had called it an egregious example of executive overreach. "But what we have to do is not let that define this moment", said Republican Senator Cory Gardner on CBS's "Face the Nation" program. Trump later declared "the language used by me at the DACA meeting [Thursday] was tough, but this was not the language used".

The president sought to shift from the defensive by portraying Democrats as not truly interested in an immigration deal. She said that the bipartisan proposal rejected by Trump did not address core security issues facing her department and that Trump's administration was not interested in "half measures".

Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., defended the agreement as a "principled compromise" on NBC's "Meet the Press" and said, "I hope people will explore it".

  • Sylvester Abbott