Net neutrality rules officially repealed in US

The more realistic goal of the act is to put pressure on Republicans ahead of the 2020 elections - only changes in leadership are likely to have an effect on U.S.net neutrality rules.

Black says he's nervous the repeal of net neutrality could curb the flow of internet traffic to his website and hurt business. It also gives them the freedom to charge people more money for faster access, which would likely make the entire internet slower for everyone else. Under the new guidelines, ISPs can block, throttle, or prioritize internet content as much as they like, as long as they clearly disclose to customers that that's what they're doing.

"Americans across the country are raising their voices against the Trump assault on the free Internet, yet House Republicans inexplicably refuse to listen to the will of the people and save net neutrality", she continued. That means no speeding up or slowing down connection speeds, and no blocking of specific websites.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai speaks to members of the media after a commission meeting December 14, 2017 in Washington, DC. To commemorate the occasion, FCC chairman Ajit Pai - the man mainly responsible for the repeal of Net Neutrality - penned an op-ed piece for CNET in which he champions the dissolution of internet regulations.

"The gutting of net neutrality is a symbol of our broken democracy", said Evan Greer, deputy director of Fight For the Future, in a statement Monday.

Pai says Internet service will become cheaper and faster with the rules now gone. State governments are also taking action with more than half of the states exploring their own Net Neutrality legislation. The idea was that all Internet traffic should be treated equally by broadband providers. In California, SB 822 is scheduled for Assembly committee hearings this month after the state senate approved it at the end of May. Additionally, 22 states' and Washington DC's attorneys general have filed a lawsuit alongside almost a dozen other groups, challenging the FCC decision.


But supporters of net neutrality-such as big tech companies like Google and Facebook, as well as consumer groups and pioneers of the internet like World Wide Web creator Tim Berners-Lee-say the internet as we know it may not exist without these protections.

On May 16, the U.S. Senate, where Republicans hold only a narrow majority, voted 52 to 47 to overturn the decision by the FCC - which is now composed of three Republicans and Rosenworcel.

Some small-business owners are anxious, too, that industry giants could pay to get an edge and leave them on an unfair playing field.

Zero-rating programs weren't specifically barred under the now-defunct net neutrality protections.

The blocking and slowing of websites gets much of the attention in the net neutrality debate.

  • Kara Saunders